20 November, 2009

More Songs

I posted the following to the widget on the right last night.  Unfortunately, nobody could click on this particular widget to see the posted songs, because it's configuration was wrong for my Blog layout.  I have fixed that problem, so beside the fact that anyone older than 21 is going to have some trouble reading the names: the following songs, as sung and played by me, are posted on the widget:

1)  Agnostic Ruse

2) The Ides of March

3) The Devil Beats His Wife

4)  New Diets Of Song

5)  The Pleasure Was Mine

The songs obviously could be better, I hardly am playing with state of the art equipment.  Agnostic Ruse in particular benefits from being played through a sound system of some kind.  You can barely hear me.  By the way, this is me singing last night, during about a 3.5 hour session, of hurried recording.  Most are in one or two takes, and recording music doesn't have any of the spiritual dimension for me, that simply singing it in extended, rapturous sessions does.  So... it's hard to come away "satisfied."  However, as my experience, and my equipment begin to inform the process more, some of the very creative juice that allows for the songs in the first place, will step in on this side of the river.  Currently the water seems a bit wide.

None the less, I wanted to share, and that's what I am doing.  Thanks.

11 comments:

PO Johnson said...

You are a creative man, Andy. I really liked hearing your songs. It give your songs new dimensions hearing them (not merely reading them). It's a good thing, being able to reach out with your creativity.
I whish I could do that too, in more ways than my writing.

Ande said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Ande said...

I listened at the songs for some time;

I second PO; I love finally hearing these songs been sung by you.

Andy Coffey said...

Po,

Thank you. Yeah, to say the least, I think the singing has it's benefits. I wrote poetry since I was a kid, and songwriting, while certainly no walk in the park, turned out to be a natural way toward a sharing I am more comfortable with.
It's funny how different things can sound from one time in your life to another. Oftentimes, the very moment of inspiration holds the closest thing to my truest feelings, that I have ever known. Craft knows nothing of such truth. But it necessary to share "them" with you. Thats how it is with songs anyhow. Writing doesn't seem to plague in such a manner. It's interesting.
Talking about peoples lives, in the real world, or on blogs, is always going to be the gold standard of human communication for me. Next to that, my self centered creative life is delusional.
And from what I can tell, Po, you choose this gold standard, instead of a great myriad of alternatives. It's enough to make a cynic cry.
I guess I thanked you once already.

Andy Coffey said...

Well Ande,

Aside from Neal, you were certainly among the first (and Jenny, of course) to ask after this stuff. I have sung to friends, and sung at a bar or two around town. I sang in school as a kid, but this stuff has a personal potency to me, that can make a man half sick.
It was funny recording these songs last night. I didn't have much time, and having worked far far too much in the last months, my whole body felt like it had a giant rock on it. Singing usually excites me so much that as I pull my guitar from it case I literally feel like I'm casting a warlocks circle within which to do something of a great deal more significance than the laundry. It doesn't just feel that way, it without a doubt IS a kind of undiscovered act of abstract, yet crucial interest to science. I can't explain it.
Singing last night was not such a time. There were all manner of "claims" on my magical circle, and I could barely hear a thing. In some few moments I could feel a "rising fate" but mostly I just felt a distance between me and "the music." And whether you realize this or not, you can really hear it in my voice.
Luckily, I am well aware that it ain't so easy, and in fact might be impossible for others to completely care.
By the end of the session last night, I felt far far more exhausted than ten silly hours of construction makes me feel.

Go figure... I consider this a kind of exercise.

You have been extremely encouraging, Ande.

Midnight Whisperer said...

I hope you don't mind... I added your playlist to my blog. Love the songs, "The Pleasure Was Mine" and "Agnostic Ruse" are my favorites so far ; )

Andy Coffey said...

M.W.

Are you kidding? Do I mind?
Probably not. Your enthusiasm, were I not aware of it's clear generosity, would be only embarrassing to me. Thank you.
Guess I'll go look at myself on your blog.
Long before winter is even here, and Narcissus is in bloom.
By the way I liked your poem in Italian I think it was. Where did you learn that?

Midnight Whisperer said...

Yes it was Italian. I've had to learn a few languages over the years, though not real fluent in any of them (just know enough to get by and get myself into trouble). I posted the translation in a comment back to you on my site.

Andy Coffey said...

M.W.

I'm doing the RosettaStone in Spanish right now. The reason: I flunked Spanish four times seventeen years ago (and I still love the language.)

I love how casually you mention these "few" languages... sound like a european. Which is cool...

I'm hoping to pick "a few" up myself.

Midnight Whisperer said...

If you are wanting to learn more than 2 languages, I would suggest learning Latin first. Most languages stem from a Latin root. Spanish is good to know here in the US though, the hispanic population is only going to grow. And no, I'm not European... Actually born and raised a Southern Girl and still am at heart ; )

Andy Coffey said...

M.W.

I've always wanted to take Latin. I think I will look at that next, after Spanish (I've invested a bit of money in this program.) I appreciate your advice American Woman. And I love your regional pride (as you know, I rather enjoy my mid-western surrounds.)
I have a song called "It Don't Rain," with the line "In the South/ There's no shame/ More than hating where you are..."
Obviously I am extrapolating on stereotypes, but then again, the Mason Dixon line is less than a hundred miles from my door. We were the Southern North. And you can hear it even in my voice.